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January PMP Numbers Up Over 6000 In One Month

Every month I get a copy of PMI Today and I annotate 3 data points: New PMPs for the month, New PMPs YTD, and Total PMPs.  You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to see PMI is certifying a volume of PMPs with no end it sight.  In January, there were 3,714 new PMPs.  Since they’ve only reported January (2010) numbers, YTD totals match.  What is the shocker is the total number of PMPs.  We’re looking at 367,619, up from 361,238 in December.  That’s right, numbers are up overall 6,381 in one month.

I did a quick compare to January of last year.  The overall total of PMPs is up by 45,369 in 12 months.  Average that out and you’re looking at 3,780 a month.

Some of you out there with other credentials curse the PMP®.  I have to admit, some of the worst project managers I have EVER met, were PMPs.  I guess the same could be said for any profession.  Certifications don’t guarantee quality, but like it or not, a lot of people drank the Kool-Aid.  If you want to exceed in project management, many of you find yourself going after one certification or another.

I do think there is merit in the PMP certification, though I would feel more comfortable if I thought PMI wasn’t in it for the money.  That’s kind of hypocritical of me, since I do make money in the support of the PMP certification.  My prediction of 2010 is PMI will hit 400,000 PMPs by June and close to 450,000 by year end.

Though not all of these current 367,619 PMPs are currently PMI membership holders, if they were (at $119 each) you’d be looking at $43,746,661 in annual membership fees.

Isn’t math fun!?

About Derek Huether

I'm Vice President of ALM Platforms at LeadingAgile. Author of Zombie Project Management (available on Amazon). Novice angel investor.

4 Responses to “January PMP Numbers Up Over 6000 In One Month”

  1. March 3, 2010 at 8:52 pm

    I think there is value in the PMP. I don’t have one, but I must say that knowing and understanding project theory certainly can’t hurt a project. Indeed, the contents of the study material are distilled knowledge amassed from thousands of people who have learned from their mistakes. That can only be beneficial.

    But the PMP doesn’t address things like soft skills effectively, and for the most part, glosses over them (I did study the PMBOK as part of my work at IBM so I’m familiar with the contents). I think that’s it’s big weakness. Projects are now, and always have been, about people. Granted, it’s tough to include all the sociological aspects of projects as study fodder and still expect students to pass an exam. But that doesn’t mean they’re not equally as essential as project theory.

    My only concern with the PMP is the hype it’s gotten among stakeholders and hiring managers that suggests a PMP is a prerequisite to being able to manage a project. Having seen some appalling PMs holding the PMP credential, I think the PMI should be a little more responsible with its marketing. That’s my two cents on it, anyway. 🙂
    .-= Geoff Crane´s last blog ..I Second That Emotion =-.

    • Derek Huether
      March 4, 2010 at 4:16 am

      Jeff, my first exposure to the PMP was several years ago when I was dealing with a stakeholder over at National Institutes of Health (NIH). I remember seeing she had this “PMP” at the end of her name and I also recall how she was horrible to deal with. She exhibited no control over what she did and didn’t follow the PMBoK at all. At the time, all I had were soft skills. So, I studied and studied, with the hope of becoming a disciplined PM. So, here is one of the disconnects I’ve seen. She was one of those people that wanted to game the system. She didn’t want to actually learn anything or to help others. She just wanted to say she was a PMP. That is what I see happening with a lot of people. I would go into more detail but this now has me wanting to write a full blown blog post.

  2. March 3, 2010 at 1:52 pm

    I think there is value in the PMP. I don’t have one, but I must say that knowing and understanding project theory certainly can’t hurt a project. Indeed, the contents of the study material are distilled knowledge amassed from thousands of people who have learned from their mistakes. That can only be beneficial.

    But the PMP doesn’t address things like soft skills effectively, and for the most part, glosses over them (I did study the PMBOK as part of my work at IBM so I’m familiar with the contents). I think that’s it’s big weakness. Projects are now, and always have been, about people. Granted, it’s tough to include all the sociological aspects of projects as study fodder and still expect students to pass an exam. But that doesn’t mean they’re not equally as essential as project theory.

    My only concern with the PMP is the hype it’s gotten among stakeholders and hiring managers that suggests a PMP is a prerequisite to being able to manage a project. Having seen some appalling PMs holding the PMP credential, I think the PMI should be a little more responsible with its marketing. That’s my two cents on it, anyway. 🙂
    .-= Geoff Crane´s last blog ..I Second That Emotion =-.

    • Derek Huether
      March 3, 2010 at 9:16 pm

      Jeff, my first exposure to the PMP was several years ago when I was dealing with a stakeholder over at National Institutes of Health (NIH). I remember seeing she had this “PMP” at the end of her name and I also recall how she was horrible to deal with. She exhibited no control over what she did and didn’t follow the PMBoK at all. At the time, all I had were soft skills. So, I studied and studied, with the hope of becoming a disciplined PM. So, here is one of the disconnects I’ve seen. She was one of those people that wanted to game the system. She didn’t want to actually learn anything or to help others. She just wanted to say she was a PMP. That is what I see happening with a lot of people. I would go into more detail but this now has me wanting to write a full blown blog post.

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